CPR Resources

Quick Facts about CPR

  • Sudden cardiac arrest is the leading cause of death in adults. Most arrests occur in persons with underlying heart disease.
  • CPR doubles a person’s chance of survival from sudden cardiac arrest.
  • 75% of all cardiac arrests happen in people’s homes.
  • The typical victim of cardiac arrest is a man in his early 60’s and a woman in her late 60’s.
  • Cardiac arrest occurs twice as frequently in men compared to women.
  • CPR was invented in 1960
  • There has never been a case of HIV transmitted by mouth-to-mouth CPR
  • In sudden cardiac arrest the heart goes from a normal heartbeat to a quivering rhythm called ventricular fibrillation (VF). This happens in approximately 2/3rds of all cardiac arrests. VF is fatal unless an electric shock, called defibrillation, can be given. CPR does not stop VF but CPR extends the window of time in which defibrillation can be effective.
  • CPR provides a trickle of oxygenated blood to the brain and heart and keeps these organs alive until defibrillation can shock the heart into a normal rhythm.

Sudden Cardiac Arrest

  • About 300,000 victims of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest are treated by EMS each year in the U.S.
  • Less than eight percent of people who suffer cardiac arrest outside the hospital survive.
  • Sudden cardiac arrest can happen to anyone at any time. Many victims appear healthy with no known heart disease or other risk factors.
  • Sudden cardiac arrest is not the same as a heart attack. Sudden cardiac arrest occurs when electrical impulses in the heart become rapid or chaotic, which causes the heart to suddenly stop beating. A heart attack occurs when the blood supply to part of the heart muscle is blocked. A heart attack may cause cardiac arrest.

Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR)

  • Less than one-third of out-of-hospital sudden cardiac arrest victims receive bystander CPR.
  • Effective bystander CPR, provided immediately after sudden cardiac arrest, can double or triple a victim’s chance of survival.
  • The most effective rate for chest compressions is greater than 100 compressions per minute – the same rhythm as the beat of the BeeGee’s song, “Stayin’ Alive.”

Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs)

  • Unless CPR and defibrillation are provided within minutes of collapse, few attempts at resuscitation are successful.
  • Even if CPR is performed, defibrillation with an AED is required to stop the abnormal rhythm and restore a normal heart rhythm.
  • New technology has made AEDs simple and user-friendly. Clear audio and visual cues tell users what to do when using an AED and coach people through CPR. A shock is delivered only if the victim needs it.
  • AEDs are now widely available in public places such as schools, airports and workplaces.

Teens/Youth

  • About 5,900 children 18 years old and under suffer out-of-hospital cardiac arrest each year from all causes – including trauma, cardiovascular causes and sudden infant death syndrome.
  • The incidence of out-of-hospital sudden cardiac arrest in high school athletes ranges from .28 to 1 death per 100,000 high school athletes annually in the U.S.
  • Northwest Health and Safety Inc does not have a minimum age requirement for people to learn CPR. The ability to perform CPR is based more on body strength rather than age. In fact, we think kids do better at learning CPR than most adults.

We have compiled some of our favorite safety, health and CPR  links.

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