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Hands only CPR

There is a huge emphasis and campaign to tell the public about hands only CPR. What is hands only CPR you might ask? Well its just as it sounds. We know that quality compressions (meaning hard and at a rate of 100 per minute) can make the difference in survival in most adults suffering from cardiac arrest. There is a lot of misconceptions about Hands Only CPR and it should be noted that hands only CPR is generally recommended for untrained rescuers and only for teens that have reached puberty and adults with witnessed cardiac arrest. Hands-Only CPR has been shown to be equally as effective as conventional mouth-to-mouth CPR, and people are more likely to feel comfortable performing it. A December 2012 study published in the American Heart Association’s journal,Circulation found that chest compression-only CPR performed by bystanders keeps more people alive with good brain function after having a sudden cardiac arrest.

It is important to note that there are many medical emergencies that cause a person to be unresponsive and to stop breathing normally. In those emergencies, conventional CPR that includes mouth-to-mouth breathing may provide more benefit than Hands-Only CPR. The American Heart Association recommends CPR with a combination of breaths and compressions for:

  • All infants (up to age 1)
  • Children (up to puberty)
  • Anyone found already unconscious and not breathing normally
  • Any victims of drowning, drug overdose, collapse due to breathing problems, or prolonged cardiac arrest
If you have been trained to provide CPR that includes breaths with high-quality chest compressions with minimal interruptions, provide either the conventional CPR that you learned (CPR with a ratio of 30 compressions to 2 breaths) or Hands-Only CPR. Continue CPR until an AED arrives and is ready for use or EMS providers take over care of the victim.
If you have not been trained to provide CPR that includes breaths with high-quality chest compressions with minimal interruptions, provide Hands-Only CPR. Continue Hands-Only CPR until an AED arrives and is ready for use or EMS providers take over care of the victim.
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Posted in Uncategorized

How to use an Epi-Pen

The following video is a good place to start to familiarize yourself with the use of an epi-pen. As always, talk with your healthcare provider and develop a plan for you or your organization regarding proper training and administration of epinephrine.

When to Use Your EpiPen® (epinephrine) Auto-Injector

Make sure you speak with your health care professional about how to identify the signs and symptoms of a life-threatening allergic reaction (anaphylaxis).  If you, your child or someone you’re caring for shows signs or symptoms of a life-threatening allergic reaction (anaphylaxis), inject the health care professional-prescribed EpiPen or EpiPen Jr. immediately, then promptly call 911 and seek immediate medical attention. Signs of a life-threatening allergic reaction (anaphylaxis) may include:

  • Difficulty in breathing
  • Wheezing
  • Sneezing
  • Hoarseness
  • Hives
  • Itching
  • Swelling of the lips, tongue
  • Numbness or tingling of the lips or tongue
  • Skin redness
  • Fast heartbeat
  • Weak pulse
  • Feeling very anxious
  • Confusion
  • Stomach pain
  • Losing control of urine or bowel movements (incontinence)
  • Faintness or “passing out” (unconsciousness)

Don’t be afraid to use the EpiPen Auto-Injector during a life-threatening allergic reaction (anaphylaxis). Using it at the start of such a life-threatening allergic reaction may prevent the reaction from becoming worse. Remember, the EpiPen Auto-Injector is not a substitute for emergency medical treatment.

There are no absolute contraindications to using EpiPen Auto-Injectors in a life-threatening allergic reaction (anaphylaxis). People with certain medical conditions have a higher chance of having serious side effects from EpiPen Auto-Injector. The EpiPen Auto-Injector should be used with caution if you have heart disease, high blood pressure, thyroid conditions or diabetes, or if you are pregnant or take medicines that can cause heart-related symptoms. These conditions should be discussed with your health care professional.

Posted in Emergency Preparedness, Uncategorized

AED Programs in the Portland, OR and Vancouver, WA areas

aeds-in-schools

Are you looking to establish an AED program in your school, church, business or club? When it comes to establishing quality AED programs in the Northwest, nobody has more experience than Northwest Health and Safety Inc. Getting an AED is more than just purchasing an AED and hanging it on the wall, Washington and Oregon has specific requirements and prerequisites in order to be provided immunity as defined by state law. Northwest Health and Safety Inc. is a reputable and authorized distributor that has handled large school and business AED deployments and can assist customers in assuring that state requirements are met to assure program success and minimize legal risk. Northwest Health and Safety Inc. services all brands from Philips, ZOLL, Cardiac Science, Defibtech, Heartsine and Medtronic Physio Control. We can assist with AED upgrades and device maintenance and inspections.

Posted in AED's, Emergency Preparedness, News

First Aid Requirements for Washington Child Care Centers

Rules for First Aid Supplies and CPR and First Aid Training Requirements for Washington State Childcare Centers and daycares.

So you are a new childcare center or opening an in home daycare? What first aid supplies and training you required to have? Good news is that Washington state is very specific in defining the requirements for first aid kits and first aid/CPR training in child care centers. The rules are defined in WAC170-295-5010 and WAC170-295-1100

Washington WAC170-295-5010

What First Aid supplies are required in my center?

(1) You must maintain on the premises adequate first-aid supplies conforming to the center’s first-aid policies and procedures. The center’s first-aid supplies must include:

     (a) A supply for each vehicle used to transport children; and

     (b) A portable supply, which can be taken on walks and field trips.

     (2) You must store first aid supplies:

     (a) Inaccessible to children;

     (b) In an area easily accessible to staff;

     (c) Separate from food; and

     (d) In a clean and safe manner to prevent contamination such as in a tackle box or other container, away from chemicals and moisture.

     (3) Your first-aid kit must include at least:

     (a) A current first-aid manual;

     (b) Sterile gauze pads;

     (c) Small scissors;

     (d) Band-Aids of various sizes;

     (e) Roller bandages;

     (f) Large triangular bandage (sling);

     (g) Nonsterile protective gloves;

     (h) Adhesive tape;

     (i) Tweezers;

     (j) One-way CPR barrier or mask; and

     (k) At least one unexpired bottle of Syrup of Ipecac that must be given only at the direction of a poison control center.

Another question we get frequently is: As a childcare provider am I required to have CPR and First Aid Training? The short answer is “YES”. Washington’s rule for CPR and First Aid training for child care workers is defined in WAC170-295-1100

Washington WAC170-295-1100

What are my requirements for CPR and First Aid Training?

(1) You must ensure that at least one person of your staff with a current basic standard first aid and age appropriate CPR certificate is present with each group of children in your center at all times. For example, if you have six different classrooms with different groups of children, you must have a staff person in each room trained in first aid and CPR.

     (2) The person providing the first aid and CPR training must be knowledgeable about current national first aid and CPR standards. The trainer must:

     (a) Be in the medical field;

     (b) Be in the emergency field such as an emergency medical technician or firefighter;

     (c) Complete a “train the trainer” course from a reputable program such as the American Red Cross, American Heart Association, National Safety Council or labor and industries; or

     (d) Work for a company that specializes in first aid and CPR training.

     (3) First aid and CPR training must be updated as required on the card or certificate received by you or your staff person. The first aid and CPR cards or certificates must have a date of expiration.

Northwest Health and Safety Inc. is your local and online source for first aid kits and first aid products designed to help you meet Washington State child care first aid requirements. Shop for first aid kits and first aid supplies at nwmedicalsolutions.com. You can also visit our retail store and shop for your first aid kits and first aid supplies, we are conveniently located in Vancouver, Washington just minutes from Portland, Oregon. Need CPR and First Aid Training? We can help with that as well. Visit our site www.nwcprtraining.com for more information on our CPR and First Aid Training classes conveniently located in Vancouver, Washington.

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Posted in CPR Training, News

Breathing should not be the indicator of life

cpr training picture

How can you tell if a person needs CPR? What if they are still breathing? Don’t be fooled by the breathing. Over the years we were taught not to do CPR if the person is breathing. A person requiring CPR will never be breathing at all, right? Wrong! It is important to understand agonal respirations. Agonal respirations occurs frequently in cardiac arrest victims, some studies indicate that it occurs as much as 65% of the time. If you don’t know what to look for it will trick you. So what is agonal respirations and why does this happen? Agonal breathing is also known as gasping for breath. It is a sign that the body is not receiving the oxygen it needs. Agonal breathing originates from the lower brain stem and is an automatic response due to inadequate oxygen, even though the person may be in cardiac arrest (and clinically dead) the brain stem is still sending messages to breathe. Agonal breathing can present as a snorting, snoring, gurgling or gasping sound. Some describe a fish out of water or attempts for gulps of air. The duration differs from person to person, usually lasting from a few seconds to a few minutes. Agonal breathing is irregular and sporadic. It is important to remember that agonal breathing is not sufficient in delivering oxygen to the body. It is a sign of distress and is therefore not considered real breathing.

Our goal is to start CPR immediately when Cardiac Arrest occurs, so what if we see this agonal respirations? Do not use breathing as your only guide to determining to provide CPR or not. We used to worry about starting CPR on someone who doesn’t necessarily need CPR. We used to check breathing, check pulse and other signs to be sure that compressions were the right thing. The studies out now suggest that if the person is unresponsive and not breathing normally then we should start CPR as the benefits far outweigh the risks. If you are doing compressions correctly (a full 2″ in depth for an adult) the victim WILL let you know if they don’t need it. We have complied a video that show what agonal respirations looks like. Keep in mind that agonal respirations can look different among individuals but just remember, agonal respirations will not look like normal breathing.

So how do you know when it is appropriate to begin CPR? A few things to look for when approaching a victim: First off assure that the scene is safe. Secondly tap the victim and loudly ask if they are OK (A sternal rub may be appropriate to weed thru the uncertainty) Visual look at the victim and check for “normal breathing” , skin color and purposeful body movement. If it’s an adult call (or send someone to call) 911 and get the defibrillator. Start CPR with compressions. Do not delay CPR. If the person doesn’t need CPR and your doing appropriate 2″ compressions, they will let you know, versus delaying CPR and potentially decreasing the patients chances of survival.

Agonal Respirations - Video

Do you know what to do in the event of a cardiac arrest? You can with training from Northwest Health and Safety Inc. Northwest Health and Safety Inc is the Northwest’s leading provider of CPR, First Aid and AED training programs serving the Vancouver, Washington and Portland Oregon areas. We provide corporate safety training to training for individuals all at low prices. Visit our course calendar for up coming trainings or contact us at 360-737-8910 or by email.

 

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Posted in CPR Training, News

Oregon Requires AED’s in Schools

aeds in schools

The state of Oregon passed legislation that will require all schools in the state to install and maintain at least one Automated External Defibrillator. Oregon SB 1033 Relating to automated external defibrillators in schools; creating new provisions; and amending ORS431.680 and 431.690. Compliance is required on or before January 1, 2015. The legislation applies to all schools: public, private and charter schools. Northwest Health and Safety Inc is a leading provider of AED programs and implementation programs for schools in Oregon and Washington. We have successfully implemented hundreds of AED programs within schools and understand the complexities of school AED implementations. The Oregon Department of Education has provided some information, guidance and sample policies for school districts and schools.

AED Programs

Northwest Health and Safety Inc. is a leading and most experienced provider of Automated External Defibrillators (AED’s) and specializes in implementing AED programs for business, schools, golf courses, churches, non-profit organizations and industrial settings. Our AED experts can assist you with every aspect of your AED program from:

  • Budgeting
  • Device Selection
  • Program Design
  • Medical Direction/Physician Oversight
  • EMS Integration/Notification
  • Policies and Procedures
  • Maintenance
  • Installation
  • CPR/AED Training
  • Loaner programs
  • Risk Management
  • Ongoing Support
  • Expiration Reminders

There is more to setting up an AED program than just going out and purchasing an AED. There are state requirements that dictate AED placement standards and minimum requirements. Most states have 4 main requirements for AED placement in public places: CPR and AED Training, Medical Direction/Oversight, EMS notification and Maintenance in accordance with manufacture specifications (monthly inspections).

Northwest Health and Safety Inc. has successfully implemented thousands of successful AED programs within schools, churches, government buildings, businesses, golf courses, health clubs, childcare facilities and much more. We have over 13 years of experience working with AED’s and feature all the major AED brands from Cardiac Science, Defibtech, Heartsine, Physio-Control, Philips and ZOLL. For more information on AED’s visit us at AEDUniverse.com or AED4U.com. There is only one choice for implementing your AED programs in the Northwest. Northwest Health and Safety Inc. stocks replacement AED pads and batteries for all major AED brands at their Vancouver, Washington store.

Northwest Health and Safety Inc. is an Authorized AED Distributor serving Washington, Oregon and Idaho and nationwide. for more information on AED’s and AED programs visit our AED site AEDUniverse.com

 

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Posted in AED's, News

AED’s save lives in schools

aeds-in-schools

With an increasing number of students at local schools having cardiac episodes, the public is becoming more aware of what we have always known, children and young adults can and do have cardiac arrest. It is estimated that as many as 1 in 500 children have undiagnosed heart conditions, and approximately one case of sudden cardiac death occurs every three days in organized youth sports across the United States. This alarming statistic has teachers and parents on edge. “It seems that we lose at least one child locally per year due to cardiac arrest” says Jason Royse, President of Northwest Health and Safety Inc. “That number is unacceptable and there is something that we can and should be doing about it”.

Heart screening in young athletes is a priority and should be a part of every sports physical. States need to recognize that this is a public safety issue and develop strategies to make these screenings affordable and commonplace. Organizations like the Quinn Driscoll Foundation have partnered with Peace Health Southwest Medical Center to provide heart screenings for young athletes in the Clark County area at a significant discount. These screenings include a review of child’s personal and family health history, blood pressure, ECG/EKG (electrocardiogram) and echocardiogram (ultrasound of the heart).  The screenings have been proven effective and have identified cardiac conditions that have allowed young athletes the ability to seek treatment.

Training staff in CPR and use of the AED should also be a standard by all schools and districts. When cardiac arrest strikes, the clock is ticking and survival depends on early CPR and early defibrillation. You cannot depend on a fast arriving EMS unit to provide treatment. Although you will call EMS immediately, the typical EMS response time in the United States is 8-10 minutes. What do you do while you wait? You start providing care with CPR and an AED (if one is available). Some studies show that the chances of survival decrease about 10% every minute without a defibrillator. CPR is easy to learn and can mean the difference between life and death.

Implementing an AED program within each school. AED’s in schools are becoming commonplace. Many states have passed legislation requiring AED’s in schools. It is important to not just place an AED but place an AED program, there is a difference. Placing an AED in a school means nothing if there is not a plan in place for training, maintenance, placement, medical direction and other key factors addressed. AED’s save lives not just for children but adults as well. Watch this news story of a young lady that was saved with an AED.

To find out more information about any of the subjects listed click on a link:

Quinn Driscoll Foundation

Young Champions Heart Screening

AED’s in Schools

AED laws

CPR Training

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Posted in AED's, CPR Training, News

Is AED training required?

One thing we hear frequently is that AED training is not required and anyone can use them regardless of training. While AED’s are fairly easy to use, training is still required and necessary. Most states have what is called “conditional immunity” for using a defibrillator. Conditional immunity means there are conditions for which the civil immunity is granted, one of the main conditions being training by a formal CPR and AED training program. Although there are no laws (that we are aware of) that prohibit use without training, rescuers are not fully protected by the AED immunity legislation without formal training. We have reviewed some instances of negative outcomes as a result of lack of training in the use of a defibrillator. Most of these negative outcomes have come as a result of improper patient preparation prior to defibrillation. Training in the use of an AED is a simple step that should not be taken lightly. For more information on AED laws you can visit AEDUniverse.com.

Posted in AED's, CPR Training, News

Evergreen Receives Donation From Quinn Driscoll Foundation

quinndonation

The Quinn Driscoll foundation has made a $7,500 donation to Evergreen Public Schools, enough money to buy five automated external defibrillators (AEDs) for student athletes.  The donation was presented at the end of Wy’east Middle School’s football practice on September 22nd.

Scott Driscoll, head of the foundation, also gave each of the football players a sticker for their helmet.

Quinn Driscoll died in 2009 from sudden cardiac arrest while running during P.E. class at Wy’east. “From this tragedy, we established a foundation in his name with a mission to educate, screen kids for cardiac issues and provide grants for AEDs,” said Driscoll.

For more information on AED’s in schools visit AEDUniverse.com.

Watch Video

Posted in AED's, News

ZOLL 2010 CPR Upgrades Now Available

ZOLL AED 2010 Guidelines

ZOLL Medical has announced the release of the AHA 2010 guidelines software and interface stickers for the ZOLL AED Plus Automated External Defibrillator. The new software can be downloaded for free via the ZOLL Medical website by clicking here. The stickers can also be ordered thru the ZOLL website, the cost for the stickers is $10. It is important to note that the stickers are NOT required. When downloading the software you will need a USB infrared adapter to communicate with the ZOLL AED Plus. The IRDA adapters can be purchased at most electronic stores or can be ordered from our website AEDUniverse.com. For more information on the ZOLL AED Plus visit our ZOLL AED Resources page.

About Northwest Health and Safety Inc.

Northwest Health and Safety Inc. is a leading and most experienced provider of Automated External Defibrillators (AED’s) and specializes in implementing AED programs for business, schools, golf courses, churches, non-profit organizations and industrial settings.

Northwest Health and Safety Inc. has successfully implemented thousands of successful AED programs within schools, churches, government buildings, businesses, golf courses, health clubs, childcare facilities and much more. We have over 13 years of experience working with AED’s and feature all the major AED brands from Cardiac Science, Defibtech, Heartsine, Physio-Control, Philips and ZOLL. For more information on AED’s visit us at AEDUniverse.com or AED4U.com. There is only one choice for implementing your AED programs in the Northwest. Northwest Health and Safety Inc. stocks replacement AED pads and batteries for all major AED brands at their Vancouver, Washington store.

Northwest Health and Safety Inc. is an Authorized AED Distributor serving Washington, Oregon and Idaho and nationwide.

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Posted in AED's, News
Copyright 2013 Northwest Health and Safety Inc. Quality CPR and First Aid Training Classes Serving Vancouver, Washington and Portland, Oregon areas. Also visit our corporate site http://www.nwhealthsafety.com.